Developing Parent Collaboration in SEN Support

Alistair Bryce-CleggUncategorizedLeave a Comment

‘If a community values its children, it must cherish its parents.’ (John Bowlby) Take a look at the below statements. Do you find them helpful or harmful when speaking about children to parents?   ‘It’s such a shame; she is so beautiful!’ ‘You must be so worried!’ ‘Your child is still the same, even with the diagnosis.’ ‘Boys are slower to talk, don’t worry.’ ‘Oh my God, how do you cope? It must be so hard!’ ‘It’s such a shame because it’s not just his life but all of you.’ ‘It’s so sad that his sister won’t have a normal life!’ ‘Don’t worry, in my opinion, everyone’s a bit autistic.’ ‘It must be like grieving the loss of the child you thought you … Read More

Play and Neurodiversity

Alistair Bryce-CleggUncategorizedLeave a Comment

This is part three in Kerry’s series around Neurodiversity. You can find parts one and two below.   “Play must be the right of every child. Not a privilege. After all, when regarded as a privilege, it is granted to some and denied to others, creating further inequities. Play as a right is what is fair and just. Although children will engage in play differently, play is a child’s right” (Souto-Manning, 2017) The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989) states in Article 31 that play is the right of all children, yet if we think about it, play is something that we continually have to defend. Through self-directed play, children gain many things, including joy, learning, … Read More

Ways to Develop Celebratory Approaches to Observation, Assessment and Planning

Alistair Bryce-CleggUncategorized1 Comment

Introduction When it comes to children with “special educational needs” (SEN) and disabilities, we tend to see a focus on observing for concerns only, leading to valuable threads of learning being lost. This is often because we are taught that early intervention is key, and the sooner we spot those “red flags”, the sooner we can prevent a delay or SEN. However, what may initially appear to be a delay could be a gateway to a developmental difference, including autism, dyslexia, or a developmental language profile, such as being non-speaking. Our initial concerns for some children may lead to adaptations in our practice that support neurotypical progress, but for other children, we may require a more permanent change in approach … Read More